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Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos’ movies aren’t the sort that typically attract a stampede of Hollywood A-listers.

His films, which he writes with Efthymis Filippou, are deadpan, midnight-black comedies that carry out grim allegorical absurdities to extreme ends. Characters speak stiltedly in cliches while an intensifying menace envelopes them. Things get weird and then they get brutal.

And yet Lanthimos is not only a regular on the festival circuit (his latest, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” premiered at the Cannes Film Festival) but he has earned an Oscar nomination (for the script to “The Lobster”) and drawn eager stars like Nicole Kidman, Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone. “The Lobster,” a warped comedy of single life, was even a surprise box-office success, earning $9.1 million in 2016 — pretty good for a low-budget movie in which loners are hunted in the woods or turned into the animal of their choosing.

“The Killing of a Sacred Deer,” which stars Kidman and Farrell and features the breakthrough performance of Irish actor Barry Keoghan, opened last weekend with similarly packed art-house theaters. Farrell and Kidman play the parents of a suburban family terrorized by a young man (Keoghan) who’s a vague figure of comeuppance come to force Farrell’s heart surgeon to kill one of his two children as retribution for an earlier sin.

Earlier this fall at the Toronto International Film Festival, Lanthimos, Kidman, Farrell (who also starred in “The Lobster”) and Keoghan gathered to discuss their surreal and divisive film, and the peculiarities of acting in a Lanthimos film.

AP: I’m guessing from your films, Yorgos, you don’t much care for small talk.

Lathimos: I prefer the small talk to the big talk. I’m not a big talker, am I?

Kidman: He’s quiet. He’s an introvert, but not in his filmmaking.

AP: Nicole, how did you first connect with Yorgos?

Kidman: I pursued him relentlessly and he finally gave in.

Yorgos: You like saying that. I turned her down for 50 films.

Kidman: We had met. We had food together and chatted. That was a nice meeting. Then we had sort of a texting relationship. I was doing a play in London. He told me about the script. I said, “That sounds interesting, Yorgos.”

AP: How did you describe the film to your cast, Yorgos?

Lanthimos: Never get yourself into a situation where you have to describe the film.

Farrell: “It’s 104 pages of joy!” I loved it. It was remarkably different from “The Lobster,” in tone, but also existing in a grossly idiosyncratic world. It was a mystery to me, as “The Lobster” was. It’s very seldom for me that you get to read writing that is so remarkably unique. The only other time that I had a similar feeling was with Martin McDonaugh (“In Bruges”).

Keoghan: It was a weird film, a weird script, but I loved it. It’s a different kind of acting, you know? You don’t act in it. It was just a challenge. I think he hates actors, as well.

AP: Is it acting? It’s certainly a different kind of performance.

Kidman: He doesn’t like “acting,” am I right? He always says, “Stop acting.”

Lanthimos: What do you mean? There’s a lot of acting everywhere, all over the place. (Laughs)

Kidman: He says, “You’re doing too much. Stop it.”

Farrell: The best direction in 20 years of doing this job I’ve ever heard is him screaming from a monitor to an actor: “Stop trying to be so naturalistic!”

Lanthimos: Because that’s the worst! You see the effort of someone trying to be like real life. You go, “I’m embarrassed. Don’t do that.”

Kidman: I think I embarrassed him a lot.

Farrell: It takes habituated behavioral responses and pushes them to the side. It kind of presents subtext as reality and so you don’t have to play subtext at all. It feels to me to be a really honest world.

AP: Yorgos, the title refers to Euripides’ “Iphigenia in Aulis.” How related to Greek tragedy do you consider the film?

Farrell: He had a genetic disposition to arrive there and he couldn’t avoid it.

Lanthimos: These are matters that we’ve been concerned with since ancient years but they’ve actually become more taboo. I get a sense that this film upsets people because of the themes and the story. It did puzzle me in the beginning how much people are scandalized by being shown certain situations. It’s even more impressive when you realize that similar stories used to be a more common thing.

AP: Why do you think that is?

Lanthimos: I think we’ve become very conservative. We elevate as important certain things and then others we consider them taboo and we don’t touch them. There’s a facade in general that we try to use to seal ourselves from certain things. I don’t have answers but just to poke a certain nerve.

AP: Did the experience of making the film mimic the story’s trajectory from comedy to bleakness?

Farrell: If you scream into the wind for 12 hours without anyone around, you’re going to be a little bit insane for at least another 12. We almost shot in continuity so it got darker and it got bleaker and it got weightier the closer we got to a decision that’s made in the film. I was depressed by the end. It got under my skin for sure.

Keoghan: I’ve not acted since, basically. (Laughs)

Kidman: And we were in confined spaces. We were shooting in a (Cincinnati) hospital which is a very strange environment, anyway, to be shooting in. I was walking with bare feet and they were like, “Put your shoes on! You’ll pick up some weird bacteria.”

AP: Barry, you’re especially creepy in this. Did you know you had that in you?

Keoghan: I kind of did. (Laughter) Especially that spaghetti scene. I was like: “Turn up the creep-mode.”

(Source)

October 25, 2017   Ali   Articles & Interviews, Family Be first to comment

Where their children are concerned, Keith Urban and Nicole Kidman are an open book.

The couple graced the red carpet at Wednesday’s 2017 CMT Artists of the Year event at the Schermerhorn Symphony Center in Nashville, Tennessee, speaking to PEOPLE about how they address the Las Vegas shooting in their household that includes daughters Faith Margaret, 6½, and Sunday Rose, 9.

“We’re a very intimate family and we discuss many things,” said Kidman, 50. “We take responsibility of parenting so seriously, but we also keep an open conversation between our kids.”

She adds, “Sometimes we need guidance, too, but our family is based on an enormous amount of questions, love and support, and we’re trying to guide a 6-year-old and 9-year-girl right now into the world.”

The “Blue Ain’t Your Color” singer — an honoree of the evening — touches on the fact that the balance of allowing their daughters to be kids while not hiding the reality from them can be a challenge.

“There’s darkness in the world and at some point you want to keep your kids from that because you want [them] to enjoy childhood and imagination and see the world in a beautiful way, but at some point learning how to navigate that is crucial for not letting the darkness tell you how to live,” says Urban, 49.

“And that’s what we’re all in the midst of right now: How do we not let that kind of darkness change our living so much that it’s taken all the color out of it?” he asks. “How do we keep color in our life, and how do we keep it intimate and open and vulnerable?”

“It’s love. It’s what we’re dealing with,” Urban explains. “How do you love vulnerably, but protect yourself? It’s a real balance.”

“And that’s what we’re all in the midst of right now: How do we not let that kind of darkness change our living so much that it’s taken all the color out of it?” he asks. “How do we keep color in our life, and how do we keep it intimate and open and vulnerable?”

“It’s love. It’s what we’re dealing with,” Urban explains. “How do you love vulnerably, but protect yourself? It’s a real balance.”

Urban joined fellow honorees Jason Aldean, Luke Bryan, Chris Stapleton and Florida Georgia Line‘s Tyler Hubbard and Brian Kelley to open the CMT Artists of the Year event with a tribute to the victims of the Las Vegas shooting.

“They saw some things on the news, and it affected the country music community in such a massive way,” Kidman says of Faith and Sunday. “They knew when they saw us reeling. And they’re so connected to us, they’re like, ‘What’s wrong?’ ”

“So we’re in it together, trying to raise our children in this time,” adds the Emmy winner. “How do we navigate it, how do we protect, yet still give them strength and still keep them moving forward and focusing on what’s beautiful?”

“Not live in paranoia and fear,” agrees Urban, to which Kidman replies with a laugh, “And then we go to church on Sunday.”

(Source)

October 20, 2017   Ali   Events, Images Be first to comment

Wearing a pink velvet gown by Versace Nicole walked the red carpet at the CMT’s Artists of the Year Awards in support of her husband Keith Urban.

Gallery Links:
Nicole Kidman Online > 2017 > October 18 | CMT Artists Of The Year Awards
Nicole Kidman Online > 2017 > October 18 | CMT Artists Of The Year Awards – Audience

October 20, 2017   Ali   Events, Family, Videos Be first to comment

Keith Urban has been working on new music since the beginning of the year, and according to his wife, Nicole Kidman, it’s very danceable!

“I’m dancing around the living room to it already,” the 50-year-old actress gushed of the upcoming new album when the duo caught up with ET’s Sophie Schillaci at the CMT Artists of the Year event on Wednesday. “I am like, ‘Put it out!’”

The Oscar-winning actress said she’s been able to to hear how her husband’s new songs have been changing over the months of production, “and it is really fascinating.” She raved, “He is such a maestro.”

“The Fighter” singer took the stage at the country music event with fellow honorees Jason Aldean, Chris Stapleton and Little Big Town, to perform a touching cover of Tom Petty’s “Won’t Back Down.” They dedicated the show to those who have suffered tragedy this year, from the Las Vegas mass shooting, to recent natural disasters and beyond.

“It is such a perfect song for everything that has been happening the last couple months,” Urban told ET. “The strength and fortitude of the country fans is unbelievable so we wanted to acknowledge that so tonight is really all about them.”

In a bit of lighter news, Urban revealed he’d caught up with “Kick the Dust Up” singer Luke Bryan earlier in the day, where they chatted about Bryan’s judging spot on the upcoming reboot of American Idol. “He is having a blast, so I am dying to watch the show!”

(Source)

October 15, 2017   Ali   Guest Appearances, Videos Be first to comment

Everyone has been asking about why Nicole kissed Alexander Skarsgård at the Emmys? Well she talks about it on The Graham Norton Show … check out the clip here!

Sounds like she had a good 50th birthday!

October 15, 2017   Ali   Events, Images Be first to comment

This week Nicole attended the premiere of her new film The Killing of a Sacred Deer at the BFI London Film Festival. She wore a silver sequined Prada gown.

Gallery Links:
Nicole Kidman Online > 2017 > October 12 | BFI London Film Festival – Killing Of A Sacred Deer Premiere

October 10, 2017   Ali   Articles & Interviews, UN Women Be first to comment

Nicole released a statement to People in relation to the allegations against Harvey Weinstein for sexual misconduct.

Nicole Kidman is joining other Oscar-winning stars like Jennifer Lawrence, Meryl Streep, George Clooney, Brie Larson, Judi Dench, Kate Winslet and more in speaking out against Harvey Weinstein amid allegations of decades of sexual misconduct.

In a statement released to PEOPLE, Kidman — who has worked with Weinstein on seven films including Lion, Nine, Cold Mountain, and The Others — put her support behind any victims making allegations against the famed film producer.

“As I’ve stated before publicly, I support and applaud all women and these women who speak out against any abuse and misuse of power — be it domestic violence or sexual harassment in the workforce,” the actress, 50, said. “We need to eradicate this behavior.”

In September, Kidman used her Emmy acceptance speech for her role on the HBO series Big Little Lies to highlight domestic abuse and violence against women. In the series, she plays a domestic abuse victim.

“It never occurred to me that I should be at a disadvantage because I was born a girl,” Kidman wrote in a touching open letter for Porter magazine later. “The idea that women and men are equal is part of my DNA. I was raised by a strong feminist mother and a fully supportive father.”

She continued, “My feminist roots have also led me to the UN Women and my work as its Goodwill Ambassador. It is in this role that I come to fully understand the barriers that women around the world are facing. I have focused on lending my voice to women who are survivors of violence. The stories I have heard from them have shaken me to the core and changed me forever.”

The Australian actress also called on women to face challenges head on, “reclaim their lives,” and most of all, support one another and help others to know they are not alone.

“More than ever, I am aware of the need to support and celebrate each other. I like to believe I am part of a global support group network of 3.4 billion,” Kidman wrote. “Each of us, in ways big or small, will come across challenges, often arising out of the fact that we are women in a still unequal world. It has happened to me; I am sure it has to you. In those moments, I like to think of those who have my back, who lifted me up and encouraged me to believe in myself. Imagine: if you can fall back on the 3.5 billion sisters, and the many good men who are with us, what could we possibly not achieve?”

On Sunday, Weinstein was removed from his powerhouse film studio in the wake of the publication of the allegations in a New York Times report, according to Variety.

“In light of new information about misconduct by Harvey Weinstein that has emerged in the past few days, the directors of The Weinstein Company — Robert Weinstein, Lance Maerov, Richard Koenigsberg and Tarak Ben Ammar — have determined, and have informed Harvey Weinstein, that his employment with The Weinstein Company is terminated, effective immediately,” the Weinstein Company said in a statement.

In the Times article, eight women — including actress Ashley Judd — spoke out against Weinstein, accusing him of sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior. The Times also reported that Weinstein reached private settlements with eight women, including actress Rose McGowan.

Weinstein responded to the allegations in the report, saying he was working with a therapist to address his issues head-on. “I appreciate the way I’ve behaved with colleagues in the past has caused a lot of pain, and I sincerely apologize for it,” he said. “Though I’m trying to do better, I know I have a long way to go.”

The mogul’s then-attorney Lisa Bloom said in a statement that her client “denies many of the accusations as patently false,” though Weinstein said that he “bear[s] responsibility for my actions” in an interview to The New York Post on Friday. Another lawyer for Weinstein, Charles Harder, said the mogul has plans to sue The New York Times.

On Tuesday, a new expose in The New Yorker revealed — among 13 different women’s accounts of alleged sexual harassment, assault or rape — that the mogul allegedly forcibly performed oral sex on Italian actress Asia Argento two decades ago.

Actresses Mira Sorvino and Rosanna Arquette also claimed that after rejecting Weinstein’s unwanted advances, they were removed from or kept from being hired for projects.

October 4, 2017   Ali   Destroyer Be first to comment

Exciting news! Nicole has a new project according to Variety!

Nicole Kidman will star in the Los Angeles crime thriller “Destroyer” from director Karyn Kusama.

She will portray an LAPD detective who, as a young cop, was placed undercover with a cult-like gang in the California desert. When the leader of that gang re-emerges many years later, she must work her way back through the remaining members and into her own history with them to finally reckon with the demons that destroyed her past.

Casting is currently underway on the film. Kusama will direct from an original screenplay by Phil Hay and Matt Manfredi (“Ride Along”).

30West will fully finance the film. “La La Land” producer Fred Berger of Automatik is producing alongside Hay and Manfredi, who also wrote and produced Kusama’s “The Invitation.”

Rocket Science is handling international sales and helped arrange the financing, while ICM Partners and CAA are representing the North American rights to the film.

“Phil and Matt have written one of the most compelling screenplays I’ve ever read, Nicole is at the top of her game — doing tremendously exciting work — and Karyn is one of the most assured voices working today,” Berger said. “It’s a powerful combination, sure to produce an iconic character, and I feel lucky to be in their company.”

Kidman starred in HBO’s hit limited series “Big Little Lies,” which just earned her an Emmy Award. Her recent film credits include Sofia Coppola’s “The Beguiled” for Focus Features and Yorgos Lanthimos’ “Killing of a Sacred Deer” for A24. Kidman has been nominated for four Academy Awards, winning for her performance in Stephen Daldry’s “The Hours.”

Kidman is represented by CAA and Media Talent Group, Kusama by ICM Partners, and Hay and Manfredi by UTA.

September 30, 2017   Ali   Articles & Interviews, UN Women Be first to comment

Nicole Kidman is lending her voice to the voiceless.

The Oscar-winning actress, 50, wrote a touching open letter for Porter magazine in which she spoke out against domestic violence after her Emmy win for her portrayal of a woman who is abused in HBO’s Big Little Lies.

“It never occurred to me that I should be at a disadvantage because I was born a girl,” Kidman wrote in the letter. “The idea that women and men are equal is part of my DNA. I was raised by a strong feminist mother and a fully supportive father.”

She continued, “My feminist roots have also led me to the UN Women and my work as its Goodwill Ambassador. It is in this role that I come to fully understand the barriers that women around the world are facing. I have focused on lending my voice to women who are survivors of violence. The stories I have heard from them have shaken me to the core and changed me forever.”

The Lion actress also explained how she witnessed survivors of domestic violence “reclaim their lives” and understood how crucial that was.

The Australian actress called on women to face challenges head on and, most of all, support one another and help others to know they are not alone.

“More than ever, I am aware of the need to support and celebrate each other,” Kidman wrote. “I like to believe I am part of a global support group network of 3.4 billion.”

“Each of us, in ways big or small, will come across challenges, often arising out of the fact that we are women in a still unequal world. It has happened to me; I am sure it has to you. In those moments, I like to think of those who have my back, who lifted me up and encouraged me to believe in myself.

“Imagine: if you can fall back on the 3.5 billion sisters, and the many good men who are with us, what could we possibly not achieve?”

After winning the Emmy for outstanding lead actress in a limited series or movie for Big Little Lies, the actress dedicated her award to her family and their incredible support.

“I also am a mother and a wife,” she said. “I have two little girls — Sunny and Faith — and my darling [husband] Keith [Urban], whom I asked to help me pursue this artistic path, and they have to sacrifice so much for it. So, this is yours. I want my little girls to have this on their shelf and look at it and go, ‘Every time my mama didn’t put me to bed, it’s because of this. I got something!’”

(Source)



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