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British Vogue highlights Nicole as one of their Women Up-Ending the Status Quo!

This awards season, Vogue shines a light on the actors bringing important, female-centric stories to life and proving the tide is finally turning in Hollywood.

After Frances McDormand had collected her Best Actress Oscar for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri at last year’s Academy Awards, and thanked those she needed to, she asked every female nominee in every category to stand up.

“Look around, ladies and gentlemen,” she implored the audience in that deliciously droll way of hers. “Because we all have stories to tell and projects we need financed. Don’t talk to us about it at the parties tonight. Invite us into your office in a couple days, or you can come to ours, whatever suits you best, and we’ll tell you all about them.”

McDormand’s speech came at the end of an awards season typified not by the usual glittering dresses and gushing platitudes, but by an all-black dress code and politically charged words. In the aftermath of the Harvey Weinstein scandal, which had broken five months prior, women across the film industry came together in a show of solidarity: they spoke up for each other in the press, listened to one another at Time’s Up meetings and wore the same uniform on the red carpet. The awards ceremonies of 2018 were a line in the sand.

This year, it might be back to business as usual on the wardrobe front, but McDormand’s message still stands. In the February issue, British Vogue turns the lens on the actors bringing important stories to life: whether it is Rosamund Pike immortalising the fearless war correspondent Marie Colvin, Felicity Jones as the trailblazing Ruth Bader Ginsburg or first-time actress Yalitza Aparicio telling the real-life story of Academy Award-winner Alfonso Cuarón’s childhood nanny. Yes, the domestic roles are still there, but they are richly written and complex – not wordless bystanders to the action. Take Carey Mulligan’s career-defining performance as a wife and mother in Wildlife, or Nicole Kidman’s Oscar-worthy turn as a mother struggling with her son’s sexuality in Boy Erased.

Read exclusive excerpts from the Hollywood portfolio below, and see the full spotlight on the 2019 success stories in the February issue of British Vogue, which is available to buy now.

Nicole Kidman
Destroyer and Boy Erased

“It’s the type of role I’ve never been offered before and, perhaps on paper, not the type of role people would think I’m suited to,” says Nicole Kidman of her extraordinary turn as Erin Bell in Destroyer: a gaunt, savagely violent, emotionally wounded detective who’s thrown back into her past when an old case reopens. “It definitely helps to transform into the role,” she says of her altered appearance. Meanwhile, her portrayal of Nancy Eamons in Boy Erased is garnering rave reviews. As a mother trying to reconcile her religious beliefs with having a gay son, Kidman, 51, masterfully brings the complexity of life to bear in her work. “You want only the best for your child,” she tells Vogue. “But you don’t always get it right.”


January 4, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

The HFPA has been releasing the names of the presenters for this Sunday’s Golden Globe Awards Ceremony. Nicole will be one of the individuals presenting. Here is the list:

Halle Berry
Sterling K. Brown
Idris Elba
Jamie Lee Curtis
Jessica Chastain
Emma Stone
Kristen Bell
Emily Blunt
Olivia Colman
Taron Egerton
Richard Gere
Danai Gurira
Nicole Kidman
Lucy Liu
Antonio Banderas
Julianne Moore
Maya Rudolph
Megan Mullally
Chris Pine
Amy Poehler
Rachel Weisz
Steve Carell
Gina Rodriguez
Kaley Cuoco
Dick Van Dyke
Harrison Ford
Johnny Galecki
Justin Hartley
Taraji P. Henson
Felicity Huffman
Allison Janney
Michael B. Jordan
William H. Macy
Chrissy Metz
Mike Myers
Lupita Nyong’o
Gary Oldman
Jim Parsons
Sam Rockwell
Saoirse Ronan
Octavia Spencer
Lena Waithe
Chadwick Boseman
Catherine Zeta-Jones
Ben Stiller

January 4, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

Best Performances: Featuring Nicole Kidman, Claire Foy, Rami Malek, and 29 of Hollywood’s Biggest Stars

At the movies, 2018 was truly the year of the woman. In the past, that claim has been made optimistically, but this time around weighty female-centric films abounded. Actresses have, thankfully, moved beyond the sexy girlfriend or loyal helpmate clichés. Standout roles included brilliant, conniving ladies in waiting in The Favourite; a housekeeper at the heart of a fractured family in Roma; the hidden power broker behind the presidency of the United States in Vice; and an avenging cop in Destroyer. Along with these much-needed female points of view, there was also more racial diversity—and irrefutable proof that audiences are clamoring for new kinds of stories, featuring communities that have been previously ignored. The terrific superhero film Black Panther made $1.35 billion worldwide; Crazy Rich Asians, $238 million. The crowd-pleasing Green Book, which tells the true story of an unlikely interracial friendship in the 1960s, and If Beale Street Could Talk, based on James Baldwin’s classic novel set in Harlem in the early ’70s, were both period pieces that reminded audiences how things have—or haven’t—changed when it comes to race relations in America. Similarly, Boy Erased, about gay-conversion therapy, shined a light on a horrible practice that, disturbingly, is still around today. This portfolio portrays the leading Hollywood stars of 2018 in an eccentric universe created by the photographer Tim Walker. In fantastical scenarios featuring mysterious egg people and a giant bouncy castle, established actresses including Nicole Kidman, ­Saoirse Ronan, Amy Adams, and Margot Robbie rule alongside up-and-comers like KiKi Layne, Elsie Fisher, Yalitza Aparicio, and ­Elizabeth Debicki. Actors such as Michael B. Jordan, Timothée Chalamet, ­Willem Dafoe, and Mahershala Ali join in on the festivities, helping us celebrate the fact that there are finally big changes happening on the big screen. And there is no going back.

NICOLE KIDMAN
in Boy Erased and Destroyer

“In Destroyer, I play a cop who’s been through a lot—she’s very American, very angry, distressed, and disturbed. I wasn’t the first choice for that role—it went to somebody else and she didn’t want to do it. I read the script and put my hand up and said, ‘What about me?’ ”

Did the wardrobe contribute to the character?
We took so long to find the leather jacket that I wear in pretty much every frame of the film. I became so obsessed with that jacket, I would wear it at home. I put it on first thing in the morning. My kids visited the set and were shocked at the way I looked. You know, I’ve been working as an actor since I was 14 years old. It’s a choice, but it’s also a calling. Sometimes, I kind of try to move away, but it always pulls me back.


January 3, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

The Wrap shares a possible Big Little Lies season 2 premiere date.

Now that HBO has revealed “Game of Thrones” will be returning for its eighth and final season in April — though the official premiere date is still TBD — it’s high time the premium cabler tells “Big Little Lies” fans when they’ll get Season 2 of their fave series. Except maybe “BLL” star Nicole Kidman already beat them to the punch.

Kidman — who plays Celeste on HBO’s adaptation of the Liane Moriarty novel — made a quick appearance alongside her husband on CNN’s “New Year’s Eve Live with Anderson Cooper and Andy Cohen” Dec. 31, and dropped what she believes to be the premiere month for the sophomore installment of “Big Little Lies.”

“June, I think. We’re looking at June,” Kidman said when Cohen asked her when we can expect the second season to premiere. “We’re still in the midst of editing it, but, um, thanks for asking ’cause we’re glad that people are excited about it.”

HBO declined TheWrap’s request for comment on a June premiere date for Season 2.

Kidman added: “The reason we did [a second season] is because audiences were like, ‘You have to do a second season!’”

The actress is referencing how the show was originally intended as a limited series, as it wrapped up its initial seven-episode run in April 2017 pretty much where Moriarty’s novel left off. But viewers loved the show so much that HBO decided to renew it for another year.

Fingers crossed!


January 3, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

Collider speaks with director Karyn Kusama about Nicole’s role in Destroyer.

With Destroyer now playing in limited release, I recently sat down with director Karyn Kusama’s to talk about making the film. During the wide-ranging interview, she talked about why she didn’t want to use soundstages, Nicole Kidman’s amazing performance, the challenges of filming the bank heist in camera and on a very limited schedule, what she learned from early screenings, what her three-hour version of the film would have been like, how she works with screenwriters Phil Hay and Matt Manfredi, and more. In addition, she talked about the resurgence of Jennifer’s Body and why she loved working on Halt and Catch Fire.

If you haven’t seen the trailers for Destroyer, the neo-noir crime thriller is led by an incredible Nicole Kidman performance (one of the best of the year), which sees her playing a LAPD detective Erin Bell who is haunted by her undercover past. When her old gang leader resurfaces, we follow Bell as she tries to figure out where he is. As she pursues him, we see flashbacks that slowly reveal how her undercover operation years ago went so wrong. Scripted by The Invitation writers Phil Hay and Matt Manfredi, the film also stars Sebastian Stan, Toby Kebbell, Bradley Whitford, Tatiana Maslany, Jade Pettyjohn, and Scoot McNairy.

Check out what Karyn Kusama had to say in the player below the fold.

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January 3, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

Some beautiful images from a recent shoot that Nicole did for the Los Angeles Times Actress Roundtable.

Gallery Links:
Nicole Kidman Online > Outtakes > 2018 > 026


January 3, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

Nicole joined Amy Adams, Melissa McCarthy, Viola Davis, Lupita Nyong’o, Saoirse Ronan, and Marina de Tavira for the Los Angeles Times Actress Roundtable.

​They may be internationally recognized as Hollywood’s most glamorous movie stars, but the women on this year’s Envelope’s Ac​tress Roundtable all insisted they’re most passionate about representing flawed, bare-faced, complex female characters on the big screen.

The Envelope recently sat down with Nicole Kidman, who played an undercover cop with addiction struggles in “Destroyer,” as well as the mother of a teen sent to a gay conversion program in “Boy Erased”; Viola Davis, who starred as a woman who must pull off a heist to settle her late husband’s debts in “Widows”; Saoirse Ronan, who took on an iconic Scottish monarch in “Mary Queen of Scots”; Lupita Nyong’o, who appeared as a spy tasked with keeping Wakanda safe in “Black Panther”; Amy Adams, who tackles real-life political figure Lynne Cheney in “Vice”; Marina de Tavira, who played a mother who relies heavily on her nanny to help with her children during a divorce in “Roma” and Melissa McCarthy, who brought to life ​a writer who finds she can make money forging literary memorabilia in “Can You Ever Forgive Me?​”​

The far-ranging discussion touched on how becoming producers has changed their approach to acting (unleashing the Kraken!), what an Oscar nomination does to your career and the joy of playing flawed, imperfect women. Here is an excerpt of that conversation, edited for length and clarity.

Viola, in talking about your movie “Widows,” you’ve been doing it with such confidence and joy. Do you feel like there was a moment where you sort of turned a corner and came into yourself?
Davis: You don’t come into yourself just overnight. It’s gradual. You sort of fail, you get back up, you hit another wall, you fail again, you have a moment of success. I would say that I really came into myself with “How to Get Away With Murder.” Only because it was a character that had all of the adjectives that were never associated with me as an actress. And not just because I was African American and dark skinned — because it just wasn’t my type. Any time someone said “attractive,” if it was in the breakdown, I didn’t get that role. So when the character was described as sexual and possibly sociopathic, I was like, “not me.” … I really had to come into myself. I really had to take chances. But I still feel like I’m coming into myself, because now I’m at a point where I sort of am losing some passion, because this [promotion] can kind of do it to you. You’re feeding two monsters — the actor and this [gestures to the group]. And feeding this can take away from the actor, it really can.

What is that process like, when you say finding your passion?
Davis: I think you need a challenge. I created a production company out of necessity, because if I literally waited for Hollywood, I would still be mama. But because of the production company and because of my imagination, I can find those emerging artists out there somewhere floating around writing for someone like me. I always say I want my “Klute.” I want my “Alice Doesn’t Live Here.” I want my “Kramer vs. Kramer.” I want to be that black girl in a movie that is just a paradox, a whirling dervish. So, that’s how I hope to find my passion again.

Nicole, you’ve also become more involved in producing projects. What’s the inspiration for that?
Kidman: Initially, it was born out of frustration because I just wasn’t getting offered anything that was of any substance. It feels very good, you feel, “Ah, I can actually do something that puts me in a little bit of control of my destiny.” And I think a lot of us as actors, we don’t have control of our destiny so much. Because as much as we’re wanting to have roles and opportunities, a lot of times you only get what you audition for. Most people don’t get the choice of how to construct a career.

Amy Adams: I think I prefer producing.

McCarthy: Really?

Adams: The day-to-day. I love being on set and being a part of the solution and having people hear me. That was a new thing for me. … As an actress, I found that whether or not people would hear me, I didn’t trust my own voice. I felt like that wasn’t my place to make a suggestion that would improve the day, whereas, as a producer, I had no trouble, and I really loved it. And now I’m sure going back to just being a — what they call, which I hate — an actor for hire, I’m going to feel like, “Nobody puts baby in the corner.” A beast has been unleashed.

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January 3, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

Nicole Kidman’s kids weren’t big fans of her latest transformation for a role.

ET’s Nischelle Turner caught up with the 51-year-old Destroyer star and the film’s director, Karyn Kusama, to discuss Kidman’s Golden Globe-nominated transformation into former undercover cop Erin Bell. Kidman is nearly unrecognizable in the film — with short, dark hair, a pallid complexion and dark under-eye circles — so much so that it “scared” her two children with husband Keith Urban, Sunday, 10, and Faith, 7.

“They were a bit scared. They found it scary, yeah,” Kidman admits. “[My character is]… angry and she’s defensive and she’s on a mission and she has a lot of rage, but she also has a lot of pain and heart and is trying to fix the damage and heal things… I think that’s very emotional, but it’s a good story too.”

For the role, Kidman completed makeup tests, one of which was at her home. That, she says, made her transformation into the character all the more real.

“When it becomes in your home and you just kind of there, it’s very gritty,” Kidman notes. “What happens is it becomes authentic, so then it just becomes, like, oh this is very real to me. I’m in this skin. I’m in this person. I’m not standing on the outside trying to make this happen.”

The complete transformation, Kusama reveals, was in large part thanks to Kidman, who wanted to disappear into the character.

“Nicole said something at the very beginning of all of our creative conversations that struck me and was part of why I knew I had to work with her,” Kusama shares. “Which was, ‘I don’t want to look like Nicole Kidman. I don’t even want people to see me. I need people to only see Erin Bell.'”

“That takes a tremendous amount of bravery to kind of jump off that cliff with the director,” Kusama adds. “We could have had very different ideas of what the character looks like, but, in fact, Nicole was so open to exploring the fact that this was a character who wore a lot of pain and a lot of damage and despair in her physical self. It affected the way she spoke, and the way she walked, and the way she thought. You know, the way she reasoned with the world.”

For Kidman, she decided to work off her character’s physical appearance in order to internalize what she was going through.

“I just had to move inside her and the exterior I sort of left up to Karyn,” Kidman says. “I’m now just going to exist in it and out of that came the movement and the voice and all the things that you would think are done by your brain, but were actually done because of the heart and the inside.”

Click here to watch the interview video!


December 18, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

Last night was the premiere of the film Aquaman in Hollywood. Nicole attended along with her co-stars and I have added images to the gallery from the red carpet. Nicole looked beautiful in a champagne colored, ruffled halterneck gown.


Gallery Links:
Nicole Kidman Online > 2018 > December 12 | Aquaman Premiere In Hollywood


December 13, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

Nicole was chosen as one of Entertainment Weekly’s 2018 Entertainers Of The Year. Here is an interview she did for the magazine.

The actress on her big year that includes ‘Destroyer,’ ‘Boy Erased’ and ‘Big Little Lies.’


December 13, 2018  •  Leave a Comment


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